Layer 8 Live

A proactive security culture is one in which employees have engaged their hearts and minds in service to their understanding of security issues. Our workshops use a range of techniques which are designed to encourage participants to consider security as something which affects them personally, and for which they can take personal responsibility.

Interested in booking one of our workshops?

Our workshops tackle specific security issues in ways that ‘stick.’

OrangeArrowWe use real-life scenarios, scripted and performed by professional actors. Participants are invited to stop and change the action in order to test the decisions they make, and model best practice.

OrangeArrowWe use storytelling as a keystone of knowledge and learning. We place abstract data security terms – such as ‘identity theft’, ‘responsibility’, and ‘breach’ – at the heart of very human stories.

OrangeArrowWe get people talking and modelling better versions of current security reality. Utilising dynamic interactive exercises, within a forum for debate, participants will consider what the ‘ideal security culture’ would look like and how people would behave.

The ability of drama and storytelling to engage its audience mentally, physically, and emotionally is one of its most potent uses in training for behavioural change.

Workshops – Rehearsing for Reality

How would your organisation respond if you were hacked, had a data breach or operations where locked down due to ransomware? What would you do first? What would you say if the media got hold of the story? Do you have legal obligations? How much would it cost you? Could your business survive? Layer 8’s crisis management exercises can be run in ½ a day during which you will get to test whether your plans are up to scratch, collaboratively develop workable strategies to protect your business to prevent an attack, and deal with one should it occur!

We use drama as an approach to learning because drama allows us to see ourselves. If we can see ourselves, we can think about what it is we do and why. It also allows us to imagine ourselves doing things differently, and to try out different ways of being and doing in a ‘safe zone’ before they get real. Drama allows individual employees to see the need for change, imagine change in action and enact change for real.

Interested?

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a downloadable datasheet

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

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Are you ready for GDPR? Could your organisation survive a fine of 4% global turnover? Can you identify, locate, value and protect your data assets in your business? How can you achieve all of this before the legislation is enforced?
Bring together key stakeholders and functions from across the business to develop a workable strategy for data identification and management across your business. Create understanding of the risk, understanding of the value of the data people have access to and collaboratively develop strategies for data management that are owned and implemented by the business.
We use drama as an approach to learning because drama allows us to see ourselves. If we can see ourselves, we can think about what it is we do and why. It also allows us to imagine ourselves doing things differently, and to try out different ways of being and doing in a ‘safe zone’ before they get real. Drama allows individual employees to see the need for change, imagine change in action and enact change for real.

Interested?

Excel-IconFill in the fields below to receive
a downloadable datasheet

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

Please leave this field empty.

Could your employees be tricked into giving away sensitive company information? Have you tried to educate your employees on phishing emails yet continue to get people who fall for it? Social Engineers use sophisticated techniques to ‘hack the human’, emotional triggers, extensive research. In this workshop, professional actors present a series of social engineering scenarios – taken from real life events – and invite participants to become the directors of the action. How can they change the behaviour of the ‘victim’ to ensure that security is maintained?

We use drama as an approach to learning because drama allows us to see ourselves. If we can see ourselves, we can think about what it is we do and why. It also allows us to imagine ourselves doing things differently, and to try out different ways of being and doing in a ‘safe zone’ before they get real. Drama allows individual employees to see the need for change, imagine change in action and enact change for real.

Excel-IconFill in the fields below to receive
a downloadable datasheet

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

Please leave this field empty.

Workshops – Hacker’s Perspective

Effective security isn’t just about following rules; it’s also about understanding why hackers are so interested in the assets we have in our safe-keeping. This workshop introduces participants to the ‘hacker’s perspective’ by inviting them first, to think about why their data is valuable to a criminal, and then to put themselves in the shoes of a hacker and plan an attack. Proactive security requires an engaged relationship to the criminal mind-set, and this workshop is designed to get participants involved in thinking about why compliance is essential in the workplace.

Workshop Outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will:

OrangeArrowUnderstand the value to thieves of the data they protect.

OrangeArrowRealise the consequences of a loss or breach.

OrangeArrowDiscover the vulnerabilities in their organisation.

OrangeArrowBe empowered to defend against a range of attacks.

OrangeArrowBe ready to take personal responsibility for their security behaviours.

Workshop Outline

Activity 1 – Review and Audit of Data

Working in small groups participants will undertake a:

OrangeArrowPersonal and business data review.

OrangeArrowPersonal and business data audit.

OrangeArrowPersonal and business data valuation.

Activity 2 – The Hacker’s Perspective

Working in small groups participants will create a visual representation of:

OrangeArrowThe locations where useful data is stored.

OrangeArrowThe ways in which data could be used for profit.

OrangeArrowThe ways in which data fragments could be pieced together to create a profile.

Activity 3 – The Hack

Each group will be given the task to plan a ‘hack’ of their organisation. They will be encouraged to think operationally rather than technically. Each group will produce a plan which includes:

OrangeArrowThe goal of the hack and the potential value if achieved.

OrangeArrowThe method of the hack.

OrangeArrowThe techniques involved.

OrangeArrowThe problems to overcome.

Activity 4 – Sharing and Responses

Each group will share their planned ‘hack’ with the rest of the group, and receive feedback on oversights, flaws, and tips for improvement.

Activity 5 – Feedback

Participants will be invited to comment on the ways in which the activities have enhanced their understanding of:

OrangeArrowThe assets they are protecting.

OrangeArrowThe range of techniques employed by hackers.

OrangeArrowThe security procedures required to safeguard against hacking.

OrangeArrowThe necessity to be proactively aware of security threats.

Duration of workshop: 3 hours

Interested?

Excel-IconFill in the fields below to receive
a downloadable datasheet

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

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Workshops – Building a Security Champions Network

We know that ticking the ‘security awareness box’ is not enough. What we need is a culture where people’s natural behaviours are secure. We know, therefore, to achieve that a tick box approach won’t work. We also know that conversation and collaboration is the best way to change culture and behaviour. So if conversation and collaboration is the way to go, how can you have a conversation with each and every one of your employees?

Layer 8’s workshops to build a network of security champions draw of the successful formulas used at companies such as Openreach, National Grid and The Health Foundation, so set up sustainable groups that are self-managed and perpetuated and provide channels for two-way communication, allowing you to not only disseminate information but have a view of organisational risk and measure changes in behaviour.

Interested?

Excel-IconFill in the fields below to receive
a downloadable datasheet

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

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Workshops – Induction

In an already developed proactive security culture new starters need to know ‘how things are done in this business’. Make sure security is woven into those important first few weeks at a new company where habits are formed and working practices developed.

We use drama as an approach to learning because drama allows us to see ourselves. If we can see ourselves, we can think about what it is we do and why. It also allows us to imagine ourselves doing things differently, and to try out different ways of being and doing in a ‘safe zone’ before they get real. Drama allows individual employees to see the need for change, imagine change in action and enact change for real.

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

Please leave this field empty.

If you’d like to talk to us about a workshop in your organisation
Contact Us on 0800 7720372 or the use form below

 Yes add me to the Layer 8 mailing list so I can find out about webinars and security culture developments

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